HOMEJapanese Culture (日本の文化) > 『日本の咄家』(Nippon no hanashika)
 
Japanese Story-Tellers
HASEGAWA'S CREPE-PAPER BOOK


 
 
 
 
English ed. 1899 (Meiji 32)Catalogue No. 64

   資料ID:227145(書誌詳細画面へ接続)

 
『日本の咄家』(Nippon no hanashika
著者:ジュール・アダン(Author : Jules Adam)
訳者:オスマン・エドワーズ(Translator : Osman Edwards)
絵師:不明(Illustrator : anonymous)

 
■ 解説
 本書は、フランス公使館員のジュール・アダンが咄家<はなしか>
(落語家)と寄席<よせ>について紹介した話を、オスマン・エドワ
ーズが英語に翻訳して、フランス語版と同年に刊行したものである。
  本書によれば、この本が書かれた明治32年頃には、東京に寄席
は243軒あったという。扉絵に寄席の建物が描かれており、そこに
掲げられた看板には三遊亭圓生<えんしょう>、小圓遊<こえんゆう>
といった名跡に混じり「英国人ブラック」とある。著者は本文中で“Mr.
B...”と紹介するブラックに並々ならぬ関心を抱き、なんとか会おう
と奔走したことや、神戸で彼の寄席を聞いたことなどを述べると共に、人気を博していたブラックを同じ欧米人として誇らしいと称賛しており、この「咄家の名手」となった流暢な日本語を話すイギリス人の紹介に
かなりの頁を割いている。
  他にも寄席には履き物を脱いで入場することや、観客席で入手
出来る座布団、煙草盆、お茶、お寿司について、三味線の音で始まる
「中入り」の様子といった寄席の環境を紹介し、前座と真打ち、手妻遣
<てつまつか>い(手品師)などの出演者のことから、一席の観料や
出演者の報酬についてまで記している。日本の独特の名詞(例えば
下駄、火鉢、中売り、落とし話など)はそのままローマ字イタリックで
記し解説してある点も、著者の日本文化に対する見識の高さが窺える。
 
 
■ Explanation
 This book is an English translation by Osman Edwards of an account by Jules Adam, a member of the French legation staff, concerning professional storytellers and the "yose" halls where they performed. It was published in the same year as the French edition.
  The book asserts that there were 243 halls for such entertainment in Tokyo around 1899 (Meiji 32), when it was written. The frontispiece depicts a hall whose signboard proclaims performances not only by established names such as Sanyutei Ensho and Koenyu but "the Englishman Black." Referring to him as "Mr. B...", the author has a keen interest in Black, and goes into considerable detail about his efforts to make his acquaintance and also about the fact that he heard his performance in Kobe. He lauds Black, stating how he felt proud that another Westerner enjoyed such widespread popularity among the Japanese. He devotes a number of pages to this Englishman, who spoke Japanese fluently and became a famous storyteller.
  In sketching the atmosphere and habits of the storyteller halls, the book mentions the removal of footwear when entering; the floor cushions offered to members of the audience; the offer of tobacco trays, tea, and sushi; and the strains of the samisen that herald the start of interlude. Its descriptions cover everything from the types of performers, whose ranks included "zenza" (i.e., opening-act storytellers), "shinuchi" headliners, and "tetsumatsukai" jugglers and magicians, to specifics such as the admission charge and payment for performers. Words for things distinctive to Japan (such as "geta" clogs, "hibachi" braziers, "nakauri" peddlers working in the audience, and "otoshibanashi" word play and punch lines) are reproduced in italics and explained instead of being replaced by the closest English equivalents. This feature, too, affords a glimpse of the author's profound knowledge of Japanese culture.